Last week to register for the User Forum with early bird fees

Early bird registration for the EGI User Forum at discounted fees ends in 28 February.

The User Forum will be held in Vilnius (11-14 April), in conjunction with the European Middleware Initiative (EMI) Technical Conference. A draft programme for the event is now available.

The programme features four days packed with presentations, workshops, demonstrations and tutorials, starting at 9:00 am on Monday 11 April. The event will cover how users are making the most out of the infrastructure and how the infrastructure is providing support to the different communities.

EMI will introduce its new middleware release – dubbed EMI-1 – during a dedicated track, followed by tutorials and a ‘meet the experts’ session.

In addition to the scientific and technical sessions, the User Forum will feature an exhibition floor with booths, poster presentations and demonstrations of the latest grid applications to science. Examples include:

  • The DECIDE project will showcase diagnostic tools available to support medical doctors to spot ailments and diseases

  • The WeNMR infrastructure will present its web portals to potential users

  • g-INFO portal for monitoring Influenza A on the grid

Discounted rates end on 28 February, although normal registration for the event will be possible until 1 April.

More information:

Winter edition of Inspired newsletter, published

The Winter edition of EGI's newsletter Inpired was published today. The newsletter is available online and as a pdf file.

This issue brings you the profiles of

But that is not all...

If you want to contribute with ideas, suggestions or stories to the newsletter please let me know!

Sara Coelho
sara.coelho@egi.eu

 

 

Winter edition of Inspired newsletter, published

The Winter edition of EGI's newsletter Inpired was published today. The newsletter is available online and as a pdf file.

This issue brings you the profiles of

But that is not all...

If you want to contribute with ideas, suggestions or stories to the newsletter please let me know!

Sara Coelho
sara.coelho@egi.eu

 

 

EGI’s first anniversary – happy birthday all!

Exactly one year ago, on 8 February 2010, EGI.eu was created as a foundation under Dutch law to coordinate and manage the European Grid Infrastructure (EGI) on behalf of its participants, the European NGIs and EIROs.

The statutes of the new EGI.eu foundation were approved in the previous week during a Council meeting and signed by the seven members of EGI.eu’s Executive Board, but it was on 8 February that the registration was made official.

One year on, EGI is a thriving federation of resource providers committed to deliver sustainable, integrated and secure computing services to European researchers and their international partners.

The last 12 months have been very productive:

  • We signed Memorandums of Understanding with the Initiative for Globus in Europe and the European Middleware Initiative to provide the software required by EGI’s user community

  • We will be signing agreements with Virtual Research Communities to ensure that their needs are represented directly within the infrastructure. The WeNMR Virtual Research Community (VRC) – a worldwide e-Infrastructure for NMR and structural biology – is on track to become the first VRC to join EGI.

  • We organised a successful Technical Forum in Amsterdam, which was the first opportunity for the extended EGI community to gather and discuss the way forward towards a sustainable pan-European infrastructure.

  • Operations report a significant increase of current jobs per month (plus 86%), users (plus 38%) and active virtual organisations (plus 24%), when compared to April 2010 figures.

  • EGI’s operations, user, technical, policy and governance groups have been constituted and are meeting frequently to manage their respective areas of responsibility.

  • We have established a set of communication channels with our audiences and stakeholders, including our newsletter, website news and, most recently, our new EGI blog, a place to share your ideas, thoughts and activities with the rest of the EGI community.

This is only the start. We will continue to work hard to make EGI a sustainable and dependable provider of computing resources for European scientists and researchers for many years to come.

 

EGI’s first anniversary – happy birthday all!

Exactly one year ago, on 8 February 2010, EGI.eu was created as a foundation under Dutch law to coordinate and manage the European Grid Infrastructure (EGI) on behalf of its participants, the European NGIs and EIROs.

The statutes of the new EGI.eu foundation were approved in the previous week during a Council meeting and signed by the seven members of EGI.eu’s Executive Board, but it was on 8 February that the registration was made official.

One year on, EGI is a thriving federation of resource providers committed to deliver sustainable, integrated and secure computing services to European researchers and their international partners.

The last 12 months have been very productive:

  • We signed Memorandums of Understanding with the Initiative for Globus in Europe and the European Middleware Initiative to provide the software required by EGI’s user community

  • We will be signing agreements with Virtual Research Communities to ensure that their needs are represented directly within the infrastructure. The WeNMR Virtual Research Community (VRC) – a worldwide e-Infrastructure for NMR and structural biology – is on track to become the first VRC to join EGI.

  • We organised a successful Technical Forum in Amsterdam, which was the first opportunity for the extended EGI community to gather and discuss the way forward towards a sustainable pan-European infrastructure.

  • Operations report a significant increase of current jobs per month (plus 86%), users (plus 38%) and active virtual organisations (plus 24%), when compared to April 2010 figures.

  • EGI’s operations, user, technical, policy and governance groups have been constituted and are meeting frequently to manage their respective areas of responsibility.

  • We have established a set of communication channels with our audiences and stakeholders, including our newsletter, website news and, most recently, our new EGI blog, a place to share your ideas, thoughts and activities with the rest of the EGI community.

This is only the start. We will continue to work hard to make EGI a sustainable and dependable provider of computing resources for European scientists and researchers for many years to come.

 

Σχολείο κατάρτισης σε HPC εργαλεία και τεχνικές

Στις 29-31 Μαρτίου πρόκειται να πραγματοποιηθεί στο Εδιμβούργο της Σκωτίας το DEISA/PRACE Spring School. Στα πλαίσια του σχολείου θα αναπτυχθούν και θα παρουσιαστούν θέματα HPC (High Performance Computing) όπως εργαλεία και τεχνικές προγραμματισμού για τη καλύτερη δυνατή κλιμάκωση εφαρμογών σε υπερυπολογιστικές υποδομές.

Το πρόγραμμα του σχολείου έχει ήδη αναρτηθεί ενώ όσοι ενδιαφέρονται μπορούν να συμπληρώσουν τη φόρμα αίτησης συμμετοχής εδώ.

Παράλληλα σας ενημερώνουμε ότι στα πλαίσια του έργου DEISA πρόκειται να καλυφθούν έξοδα έως 750 ευρώ για νέους ερευνητές που εργάζονται στην Ελλάδα και δραστηριοποιούνται στο χώρο της παραλληλίας εφαρμογών για υπολογιστές υψηλών επιδόσεων. Οι ενδιαφερόμενοι καλούνται το αργότερο στις 14 Φεβρουαρίου να αποστείλουν ένα σύντομο βιογραφικό, μία περιγραφή του ερευνητικού τους αντικειμένου και μία σύντομη αιτιολόγηση της επιθυμίας τους να παρακολουθήσουν το Spring School (εν είδει letter of intent).

Software Sustainability Institute holds Collaborations Workshop

On 3-4 March this year, the Software Sustainability Institute (UK) is holding the Collaborations Workshop 2011. It’s a two-day workshop that brings together researchers who use software, funders and software developers. Its goal is to provide attendees with everything needed to create successful collaborations. We want to provide the perfect forum for people to discuss their research and their project’s requirements, and then meet the people who can fulfill those requirements.

Getting people together from different research fields is exciting and terrifying. On the one hand, who knows what problems could be solved and what new research could be started? And on the other hand, how can you possibly agenda a meeting where you don’t know who’s turning up? The easy answer is: we don’t. Rather than relying on a fixed agenda, what we discuss at the workshop depends on the interests of the people who attend. Before and during the workshop, the attendees suggest topics for discussion. At the workshop, we take a vote and only the most popular topics make the agenda.

To kick things off, we’re starting the workshop with a session of lightening talks. It’s the perfect opportunity for attendees to advertise their work and let people know who they want to collaborate with. After the talks are complete, we’ll give attendees the chance to meet up with the people they’re interested so that they can discuss potential collaborations. We’ll even try to get them sitting together at the conference dinner!

Collaboration without funding is difficult, so we’ve invited funders from every Research Council in the United Kingdom. We’re having a good take up from EPSRC, JISC and STFC and we hope to persuade representatives from the other councils to attend too.

If you use software in your research - or want to use it in the future - the Collaborations Workshop is the perfect opportunity for you to meet people who you could work with.

More information

  • Date: 3-4 March 2011

  • Location: e-Science Institute, Edinburgh

  • Registration website: http://www.nesc.ac.uk/esi/events/1169/

  • Conference website: http://www.software.ac.uk/home/cw11

  • Registration fee: £60

  • Want to know more? Contact info@software.ac.uk.
     

Software Sustainability Institute holds Collaborations Workshop

On 3-4 March this year, the Software Sustainability Institute (UK) is holding the Collaborations Workshop 2011. It’s a two-day workshop that brings together researchers who use software, funders and software developers. Its goal is to provide attendees with everything needed to create successful collaborations. We want to provide the perfect forum for people to discuss their research and their project’s requirements, and then meet the people who can fulfill those requirements.

Getting people together from different research fields is exciting and terrifying. On the one hand, who knows what problems could be solved and what new research could be started? And on the other hand, how can you possibly agenda a meeting where you don’t know who’s turning up? The easy answer is: we don’t. Rather than relying on a fixed agenda, what we discuss at the workshop depends on the interests of the people who attend. Before and during the workshop, the attendees suggest topics for discussion. At the workshop, we take a vote and only the most popular topics make the agenda.

To kick things off, we’re starting the workshop with a session of lightening talks. It’s the perfect opportunity for attendees to advertise their work and let people know who they want to collaborate with. After the talks are complete, we’ll give attendees the chance to meet up with the people they’re interested so that they can discuss potential collaborations. We’ll even try to get them sitting together at the conference dinner!

Collaboration without funding is difficult, so we’ve invited funders from every Research Council in the United Kingdom. We’re having a good take up from EPSRC, JISC and STFC and we hope to persuade representatives from the other councils to attend too.

If you use software in your research - or want to use it in the future - the Collaborations Workshop is the perfect opportunity for you to meet people who you could work with.

More information

  • Date: 3-4 March 2011

  • Location: e-Science Institute, Edinburgh

  • Registration website: http://www.nesc.ac.uk/esi/events/1169/

  • Conference website: http://www.software.ac.uk/home/cw11

  • Registration fee: £60

  • Want to know more? Contact info@software.ac.uk.
     

EGI signs MoU with the European Middleware Initiative

Alberto Di Meglio and Steven Newhouse sign the Memorandum of Understanding

The European Middleware Initiative (EMI) became the second technology provider to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the European Grid Infrastructure (EGI) on 27 January.

EGI signed an agreement with the Initiative for Globus in Europe (IGE), just a few days before.

The MoU was signed by Steven Newhouse director of EGI.eu, on behalf of EGI, and EMI’s project director Alberto Di Meglio.

“EGI is our main middleware customer,” says Di Meglio. “This MoU will make our business relationship stronger and it will help us to accomplish our common vision of providing a reliable and sustainable research infrastructure in Europe."

The EMI project started in May 2010 as a joint effort of the major European distributed computing middleware providers, including ARC, gLite, UNICORE and dCache. The project aims to improve middleware services, closely listening to the requirements of users and infrastructure providers.

“The software from EMI is critical to the reliable use of our production infrastructure by our user community,” says Newhouse. “This MoU identifies the relationship between the two projects for our mutual benefit.”
 

EGI signs MoU with the European Middleware Initiative

Alberto Di Meglio and Steven Newhouse sign the Memorandum of Understanding

The European Middleware Initiative (EMI) became the second technology provider to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the European Grid Infrastructure (EGI) on 27 January.

EGI signed an agreement with the Initiative for Globus in Europe (IGE), just a few days before.

The MoU was signed by Steven Newhouse director of EGI.eu, on behalf of EGI, and EMI’s project director Alberto Di Meglio.

“EGI is our main middleware customer,” says Di Meglio. “This MoU will make our business relationship stronger and it will help us to accomplish our common vision of providing a reliable and sustainable research infrastructure in Europe."

The EMI project started in May 2010 as a joint effort of the major European distributed computing middleware providers, including ARC, gLite, UNICORE and dCache. The project aims to improve middleware services, closely listening to the requirements of users and infrastructure providers.

“The software from EMI is critical to the reliable use of our production infrastructure by our user community,” says Newhouse. “This MoU identifies the relationship between the two projects for our mutual benefit.”