First keynote speakers for the User Forum, announced

The organisers of the EGI 2011 User Forum (11-14 April) have announced the first two keynote speakers invited for the event in Vilnius, Lithuania.

They are:

  • Steve Rawlings, an astrophysicist based at the University of Oxford and involved in the development of the Square Kilometre Array telescope, which will use a distributed network of individual radio telescopes to give the effective capacity of a very large telescope. He will talk about the data processing challenges it will provide for the e-Infrastructure community.

  • Ruth Pordes, executive director of the Open Science Grid will discuss some of the initiatives taking place with the USA’s National Science Foundation (NSF) Software Infrastructure for Sustained Innovation (SI2) program and how ‘Scientific Software Innovation Institutes’ can help the provision of cyber-infrastructures such as Open Science Grid and potentially EGI.

The deadline for early-bird registration has also been extended and discounted fees will be available until 4 March, this Friday.

The keynotes will be only a part of a packed programme of oral presentations. The talks are organised into six tracks:

  • The EMI track brings an overview of the new EMI-1 software release, as well as an outline of the plans for common execution service, data and storage solutions, quality assurance procedures and adoption of standards.

  • The User Support Services sessions will showcase the services provided by EGI.eu and its partners, as well as the domain-specific services offered by various communities.

  • The User Environments track describes a myriad of scientific gateways and portal technologies currently deployed, in addition to applications, tools and programming libraries that can simplify access to distributed resources.

  • The Virtualisation and Cloud Computing sessions will give an overview of the technologies and user experiences coming from European and national activities in this area.

  • The Technologies for Distributed Computing talks will highlight recent progress in interoperability and challenges in providing federated access to e-Infrastructures.

  • The Data Management track reviews the solutions coming from the WLCG community.
     

First keynote speakers for the User Forum, announced

The organisers of the EGI 2011 User Forum (11-14 April) have announced the first two keynote speakers invited for the event in Vilnius, Lithuania.

They are:

  • Steve Rawlings, an astrophysicist based at the University of Oxford and involved in the development of the Square Kilometre Array telescope, which will use a distributed network of individual radio telescopes to give the effective capacity of a very large telescope. He will talk about the data processing challenges it will provide for the e-Infrastructure community.

  • Ruth Pordes, executive director of the Open Science Grid will discuss some of the initiatives taking place with the USA’s National Science Foundation (NSF) Software Infrastructure for Sustained Innovation (SI2) program and how ‘Scientific Software Innovation Institutes’ can help the provision of cyber-infrastructures such as Open Science Grid and potentially EGI.

The deadline for early-bird registration has also been extended and discounted fees will be available until 4 March, this Friday.

The keynotes will be only a part of a packed programme of oral presentations. The talks are organised into six tracks:

  • The EMI track brings an overview of the new EMI-1 software release, as well as an outline of the plans for common execution service, data and storage solutions, quality assurance procedures and adoption of standards.

  • The User Support Services sessions will showcase the services provided by EGI.eu and its partners, as well as the domain-specific services offered by various communities.

  • The User Environments track describes a myriad of scientific gateways and portal technologies currently deployed, in addition to applications, tools and programming libraries that can simplify access to distributed resources.

  • The Virtualisation and Cloud Computing sessions will give an overview of the technologies and user experiences coming from European and national activities in this area.

  • The Technologies for Distributed Computing talks will highlight recent progress in interoperability and challenges in providing federated access to e-Infrastructures.

  • The Data Management track reviews the solutions coming from the WLCG community.
     

ELIXIR is one step closer to a life science infrastructure

The European Molecular Biology Laboratory’s European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), a partner of the EGI-InSPIRE project, has announced that funding for the construction of the ELIXIR infrastructure has been earmarked by the UK’s Large Facilities Capital Fund.

ELIXIR – the European Life-science Infrastructure for Biological Information – is one of the 44 ESFRI projects. Its goal is to support research in the life sciences and to facilitate knowledge transfer to researchers in the medical and environmental sciences.

Professor Janet Thornton, Director of EMBL-EBI and coordinator of ELIXIR, said: “By providing public access to the wealth of knowledge generated by the global research community, we will empower researchers in academia and industry to solve some of society’s most pressing problems.”

“ELIXIR is an ESFRI infrastructure of global significance with probably the largest number of users,” says Andrew Lyall, ELIXIR’s project manager.

The project was launched in 2007 with funds from the European Commission’s FP7 capacities programme and brings together 32 European life science organisations from 14 countries. Now in the fourth year of its preparatory phase, the project is entering a crucial phase: “we are hoping to start the construction later this year,” adds Lyall.

This large-scale initiative will provide the facilities necessary for Europe’s life science researchers to share, analyse and protect Europe’s rapidly growing store of information about living systems.

ELIXIR’s central hub will be hosted at EMBL-EBI in Hinxton, near Cambridge in the UK.
 

ELIXIR is one step closer to a life science infrastructure

The European Molecular Biology Laboratory’s European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), a partner of the EGI-InSPIRE project, has announced that funding for the construction of the ELIXIR infrastructure has been earmarked by the UK’s Large Facilities Capital Fund.

ELIXIR – the European Life-science Infrastructure for Biological Information – is one of the 44 ESFRI projects. Its goal is to support research in the life sciences and to facilitate knowledge transfer to researchers in the medical and environmental sciences.

Professor Janet Thornton, Director of EMBL-EBI and coordinator of ELIXIR, said: “By providing public access to the wealth of knowledge generated by the global research community, we will empower researchers in academia and industry to solve some of society’s most pressing problems.”

“ELIXIR is an ESFRI infrastructure of global significance with probably the largest number of users,” says Andrew Lyall, ELIXIR’s project manager.

The project was launched in 2007 with funds from the European Commission’s FP7 capacities programme and brings together 32 European life science organisations from 14 countries. Now in the fourth year of its preparatory phase, the project is entering a crucial phase: “we are hoping to start the construction later this year,” adds Lyall.

This large-scale initiative will provide the facilities necessary for Europe’s life science researchers to share, analyse and protect Europe’s rapidly growing store of information about living systems.

ELIXIR’s central hub will be hosted at EMBL-EBI in Hinxton, near Cambridge in the UK.
 

Last week to register for the User Forum with early bird fees

Early bird registration for the EGI User Forum at discounted fees ends in 28 February.

The User Forum will be held in Vilnius (11-14 April), in conjunction with the European Middleware Initiative (EMI) Technical Conference. A draft programme for the event is now available.

The programme features four days packed with presentations, workshops, demonstrations and tutorials, starting at 9:00 am on Monday 11 April. The event will cover how users are making the most out of the infrastructure and how the infrastructure is providing support to the different communities.

EMI will introduce its new middleware release – dubbed EMI-1 – during a dedicated track, followed by tutorials and a ‘meet the experts’ session.

In addition to the scientific and technical sessions, the User Forum will feature an exhibition floor with booths, poster presentations and demonstrations of the latest grid applications to science. Examples include:

  • The DECIDE project will showcase diagnostic tools available to support medical doctors to spot ailments and diseases

  • The WeNMR infrastructure will present its web portals to potential users

  • g-INFO portal for monitoring Influenza A on the grid

Discounted rates end on 28 February, although normal registration for the event will be possible until 1 April.

More information:

Last week to register for the User Forum with early bird fees

Early bird registration for the EGI User Forum at discounted fees ends in 28 February.

The User Forum will be held in Vilnius (11-14 April), in conjunction with the European Middleware Initiative (EMI) Technical Conference. A draft programme for the event is now available.

The programme features four days packed with presentations, workshops, demonstrations and tutorials, starting at 9:00 am on Monday 11 April. The event will cover how users are making the most out of the infrastructure and how the infrastructure is providing support to the different communities.

EMI will introduce its new middleware release – dubbed EMI-1 – during a dedicated track, followed by tutorials and a ‘meet the experts’ session.

In addition to the scientific and technical sessions, the User Forum will feature an exhibition floor with booths, poster presentations and demonstrations of the latest grid applications to science. Examples include:

  • The DECIDE project will showcase diagnostic tools available to support medical doctors to spot ailments and diseases

  • The WeNMR infrastructure will present its web portals to potential users

  • g-INFO portal for monitoring Influenza A on the grid

Discounted rates end on 28 February, although normal registration for the event will be possible until 1 April.

More information:

Winter edition of Inspired newsletter, published

The Winter edition of EGI's newsletter Inpired was published today. The newsletter is available online and as a pdf file.

This issue brings you the profiles of

But that is not all...

If you want to contribute with ideas, suggestions or stories to the newsletter please let me know!

Sara Coelho
sara.coelho@egi.eu

 

 

Winter edition of Inspired newsletter, published

The Winter edition of EGI's newsletter Inpired was published today. The newsletter is available online and as a pdf file.

This issue brings you the profiles of

But that is not all...

If you want to contribute with ideas, suggestions or stories to the newsletter please let me know!

Sara Coelho
sara.coelho@egi.eu

 

 

EGI’s first anniversary – happy birthday all!

Exactly one year ago, on 8 February 2010, EGI.eu was created as a foundation under Dutch law to coordinate and manage the European Grid Infrastructure (EGI) on behalf of its participants, the European NGIs and EIROs.

The statutes of the new EGI.eu foundation were approved in the previous week during a Council meeting and signed by the seven members of EGI.eu’s Executive Board, but it was on 8 February that the registration was made official.

One year on, EGI is a thriving federation of resource providers committed to deliver sustainable, integrated and secure computing services to European researchers and their international partners.

The last 12 months have been very productive:

  • We signed Memorandums of Understanding with the Initiative for Globus in Europe and the European Middleware Initiative to provide the software required by EGI’s user community

  • We will be signing agreements with Virtual Research Communities to ensure that their needs are represented directly within the infrastructure. The WeNMR Virtual Research Community (VRC) – a worldwide e-Infrastructure for NMR and structural biology – is on track to become the first VRC to join EGI.

  • We organised a successful Technical Forum in Amsterdam, which was the first opportunity for the extended EGI community to gather and discuss the way forward towards a sustainable pan-European infrastructure.

  • Operations report a significant increase of current jobs per month (plus 86%), users (plus 38%) and active virtual organisations (plus 24%), when compared to April 2010 figures.

  • EGI’s operations, user, technical, policy and governance groups have been constituted and are meeting frequently to manage their respective areas of responsibility.

  • We have established a set of communication channels with our audiences and stakeholders, including our newsletter, website news and, most recently, our new EGI blog, a place to share your ideas, thoughts and activities with the rest of the EGI community.

This is only the start. We will continue to work hard to make EGI a sustainable and dependable provider of computing resources for European scientists and researchers for many years to come.

 

EGI’s first anniversary – happy birthday all!

Exactly one year ago, on 8 February 2010, EGI.eu was created as a foundation under Dutch law to coordinate and manage the European Grid Infrastructure (EGI) on behalf of its participants, the European NGIs and EIROs.

The statutes of the new EGI.eu foundation were approved in the previous week during a Council meeting and signed by the seven members of EGI.eu’s Executive Board, but it was on 8 February that the registration was made official.

One year on, EGI is a thriving federation of resource providers committed to deliver sustainable, integrated and secure computing services to European researchers and their international partners.

The last 12 months have been very productive:

  • We signed Memorandums of Understanding with the Initiative for Globus in Europe and the European Middleware Initiative to provide the software required by EGI’s user community

  • We will be signing agreements with Virtual Research Communities to ensure that their needs are represented directly within the infrastructure. The WeNMR Virtual Research Community (VRC) – a worldwide e-Infrastructure for NMR and structural biology – is on track to become the first VRC to join EGI.

  • We organised a successful Technical Forum in Amsterdam, which was the first opportunity for the extended EGI community to gather and discuss the way forward towards a sustainable pan-European infrastructure.

  • Operations report a significant increase of current jobs per month (plus 86%), users (plus 38%) and active virtual organisations (plus 24%), when compared to April 2010 figures.

  • EGI’s operations, user, technical, policy and governance groups have been constituted and are meeting frequently to manage their respective areas of responsibility.

  • We have established a set of communication channels with our audiences and stakeholders, including our newsletter, website news and, most recently, our new EGI blog, a place to share your ideas, thoughts and activities with the rest of the EGI community.

This is only the start. We will continue to work hard to make EGI a sustainable and dependable provider of computing resources for European scientists and researchers for many years to come.