Venus-C Opens Clouds for research

Venus-C has just launched its Open Call looking for pilot applications to get up and running on the cloud.

Funded by the European Commission, Venus-C brings together industrial partners and researchers to create an enterprise-quality cloud service for Europe. To help expand the community they already have, they have launched this new initiative to fund between 10 and 20 new schemes. These pilots will also help gather additional requirements for the platform, alongside testing and validating it. The projects will have access to all of the resources VENUS-C control and be given start-up funds to get the ball rolling.

The expertise at Venus-C will also work with the successful applicants to determine what features and capabilities of Cloud computing best support their work. They hope to attract interest from a diverse range of disciplines including; the Arts & Humanities, Engineering, Health & Life Sciences, Economics, Financial Services, and Natural Sciences. Of particular interest are applications that require dynamic scaling and ubiquitous availability.

Andrea Manieri is one of the coordinators in engineering group at Venus-C and is looking forward to what this means for the project and cloud computing in general “Venus-C already has a compelling range of applications but this open call will broaden the scope of the project, and help ensure the future of an academic cloud infrastructure in Europe”.

The call is open to public and private research organisations and runs from the 11th of January to the 11th of April, 2011. The entire fund is €400,000 which will be equally divided among successful candidates. All Call documents and more information are available online.

EGI signs agreement with the Initiative for Globus in Europe

Steven Newhouse and Helmut Heller shake hands after signing the Memorandum of Understanding

The European Grid Infrastructure (EGI) and the Initiative for Globus in Europe (IGE) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) yesterday, 20 January, at EGI.eu's headquarters in Amsterdam. The MoU formalises the continuing business relationship between the two institutions.

The MoU establishes that IGE will provide new technology components to the EGI’s software repository. Specific software provision details will be defined in the future, through Service Level Agreements (SLAs).

The agreement was signed by Steven Newhouse director of EGI.eu, on behalf of EGI, and Helmut Heller, project director of IGE.

“IGE is the first technology provider to sign an agreement to provide software to EGI,” says Newhouse. “Building strong business relations with external technology providers is key to ensuring the long-term sustainability we want to offer to our stakeholders and users.”

IGE is a project set up to support and develop the Globus toolkit and strengthen the influence of European developers in the Globus alliance.

“This agreement is a very important first step to support Globus users in Europe,” says Heller. “And we hope the first of many successful steps in the IGE-EGI collaboration,” he adds.

IGE was the first technology provider to sign a Memorandum of Understanding, but it won’t be alone for long. EGI is set to sign more agreements in the coming weeks.

EGI signs agreement with the Initiative for Globus in Europe

Steven Newhouse and Helmut Heller shake hands after signing the Memorandum of Understanding

The European Grid Infrastructure (EGI) and the Initiative for Globus in Europe (IGE) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) yesterday, 20 January, at EGI.eu's headquarters in Amsterdam. The MoU formalises the continuing business relationship between the two institutions.

The MoU establishes that IGE will provide new technology components to the EGI’s software repository. Specific software provision details will be defined in the future, through Service Level Agreements (SLAs).

The agreement was signed by Steven Newhouse director of EGI.eu, on behalf of EGI, and Helmut Heller, project director of IGE.

“IGE is the first technology provider to sign an agreement to provide software to EGI,” says Newhouse. “Building strong business relations with external technology providers is key to ensuring the long-term sustainability we want to offer to our stakeholders and users.”

IGE is a project set up to support and develop the Globus toolkit and strengthen the influence of European developers in the Globus alliance.

“This agreement is a very important first step to support Globus users in Europe,” says Heller. “And we hope the first of many successful steps in the IGE-EGI collaboration,” he adds.

IGE was the first technology provider to sign a Memorandum of Understanding, but it won’t be alone for long. EGI is set to sign more agreements in the coming weeks.

The Bulgarian Grid Consortium is now fully operational

Bulgaria joined the list of countries fully operational NGIs, as announced in a broadcast to the EGI community on 18 January.

The Bulgarian Grid Consortium manages ten sites, including two large HPC clusters and provides computing resources for more than 100 users. The NGI, previously part of the South-East Europe Regional Operations Centre, was set up a consortium of academic institutions led by the Institute for Parallel Processing of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences.

“The main usage of the Bulgarian Grid resources comes from applications from Environmental Modelling, Computational Chemistry, Computational Mechanics, Semiconductor Modelling and of course the LHC experiments,” says Mariya Durchova of the Bulgarian Grid Consortium.

The Bulgarian NGI team spent the last two years adding new hardware while moving to a new operational model, adds Durchova, and a few problems related to new hardware deployment were inevitable.

The Nagios monitoring system was the last tool to become operational. Following the successful migration of all systems, the Bulgarian Grid Consortium was the first NGI to become fully operational in 2011.

The Bulgarian NGI team has many plans for the future: “We are currently planning expansion of our current infrastructure in terms of storage mainly and we are also considering the addition of a new Grid site,” says Durchova.

The Bulgarian Grid Consortium is now fully operational

Bulgaria joined the list of countries fully operational NGIs, as announced in a broadcast to the EGI community on 18 January.

The Bulgarian Grid Consortium manages ten sites, including two large HPC clusters and provides computing resources for more than 100 users. The NGI, previously part of the South-East Europe Regional Operations Centre, was set up a consortium of academic institutions led by the Institute for Parallel Processing of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences.

“The main usage of the Bulgarian Grid resources comes from applications from Environmental Modelling, Computational Chemistry, Computational Mechanics, Semiconductor Modelling and of course the LHC experiments,” says Mariya Durchova of the Bulgarian Grid Consortium.

The Bulgarian NGI team spent the last two years adding new hardware while moving to a new operational model, adds Durchova, and a few problems related to new hardware deployment were inevitable.

The Nagios monitoring system was the last tool to become operational. Following the successful migration of all systems, the Bulgarian Grid Consortium was the first NGI to become fully operational in 2011.

The Bulgarian NGI team has many plans for the future: “We are currently planning expansion of our current infrastructure in terms of storage mainly and we are also considering the addition of a new Grid site,” says Durchova.

Registration for the User Forum is now open

The EGI User Forum will take place in Vilnius, Lithuania on 11-15 April 2011 and registration for the event is now open.

The programme committee has received 154 abstracts, including posters, presentations, workshops and demonstrations. Registration will give participants access to all scientific sessions and to the exhibition area. The fee also includes conference documentation and bag, as well as to welcome drink reception, coffee breaks and lunches.

Participants can register for the event online. Discounted fees will be available until 28 February 2011, but registration will also be possible at the event at full registration price.

Registration for the User Forum is now open

The EGI User Forum will take place in Vilnius, Lithuania on 11-15 April 2011 and registration for the event is now open.

The programme committee has received 154 abstracts, including posters, presentations, workshops and demonstrations. Registration will give participants access to all scientific sessions and to the exhibition area. The fee also includes conference documentation and bag, as well as to welcome drink reception, coffee breaks and lunches.

Participants can register for the event online. Discounted fees will be available until 28 February 2011, but registration will also be possible at the event at full registration price.

Romanian NGI is now fully operational

The Romanian NGI - the Rogrid Consortium - has joined the list of fully operational NGIs. The news were broadcasted to the EGI community last November.

Alexandru Stanciu, from RoGrid, announced that the Romanian NGI "has finished its integration procedure and that all necessary operational teams and tools are established in our NGI and we are ready for production." RoGrid is visible in all operational tools as NGI_RO and is responsible for all Romanian sites, previously part of the Southeast Europe Regional Operations Centre.

RoGrid was set up in 2002 by the Ministries of Communication and Information Technology and Education & Research to support the development of the Romanian grid infrastructureand make it a consistent and coherent part of the European grid. The consortium has seven academic partners, including the National Institute for Research and Development in Informatics - ICI Bucharest, which represents Romania in the EGI Council.

Romanian NGI is now fully operational

The Romanian NGI - the Rogrid Consortium - has joined the list of fully operational NGIs. The news were broadcasted to the EGI community last November.

Alexandru Stanciu, from RoGrid, announced that the Romanian NGI "has finished its integration procedure and that all necessary operational teams and tools are established in our NGI and we are ready for production." RoGrid is visible in all operational tools as NGI_RO and is responsible for all Romanian sites, previously part of the Southeast Europe Regional Operations Centre.

RoGrid was set up in 2002 by the Ministries of Communication and Information Technology and Education & Research to support the development of the Romanian grid infrastructureand make it a consistent and coherent part of the European grid. The consortium has seven academic partners, including the National Institute for Research and Development in Informatics - ICI Bucharest, which represents Romania in the EGI Council.