EMI announces new software release

The EMI project is pleased to announce the availability of the EMI 1 (Kebnekaise) release.

This release features for the first time a complete and consolidated set of middleware components from ARC, dCache, gLite and UNICORE. The services, managed in the past by separate providers, and now developed, built and tested in collaboration, follow well established open-source practices and are distributed from a single reference repository. The reference platform for EMI 1 is Scientific Linux 5 64 bit.

Kebnekaise will be supported for 18 months, with 6 additional months of support for security issues.

For more details on the EMI 1 release and the middleware products composing it, please refer to the following links:

EMI announces new software release

The EMI project is pleased to announce the availability of the EMI 1 (Kebnekaise) release.

This release features for the first time a complete and consolidated set of middleware components from ARC, dCache, gLite and UNICORE. The services, managed in the past by separate providers, and now developed, built and tested in collaboration, follow well established open-source practices and are distributed from a single reference repository. The reference platform for EMI 1 is Scientific Linux 5 64 bit.

Kebnekaise will be supported for 18 months, with 6 additional months of support for security issues.

For more details on the EMI 1 release and the middleware products composing it, please refer to the following links:

Linking Africa and Europe

Last week saw an important step in improving research collaborations between Africa and Europe with the announcement of €14.75M of investment in the AfricaConnect project.

Modern collaborative research requires a stable and robust IT infrastructure. However African researchers interested in taking part in global research are finding that the current state of the available infrastructure in Africa is preventing them from being as active in international collaborations as they would like. AfricaConnect aims to remedy this by establishing a high-capacity Internet network for research and education in Southern and Eastern Africa. This will provide the region with a gateway to global research collaboration, making these collaborations as easy as possible.

The project brings together partners from all over Europe and Africa including the continent’s existing National Research and Education Networks (NRENs) alongside some of Europe’s. They are not alone, the project is being managed by DANTE (Delivery of Advanced Network Technology to Europe) with its counterparts the UbuntuNet Alliance and WACREN (West and Central African Research and Education Network). These three projects bring significant expertise in providing cutting edge networks and connecting European and African resources.

Over the next four years the project will work on building up the infrastructure so that by the end of the project the African partners will be able to maintain and improve the intra-regional African research network and its direct connection to international networks. The scheme should also accelerate the development of the Information Society in Africa, improving ordinary African’s access to IT and the global network.

Linking Africa and Europe

Last week saw an important step in improving research collaborations between Africa and Europe with the announcement of €14.75M of investment in the AfricaConnect project.

Modern collaborative research requires a stable and robust IT infrastructure. However African researchers interested in taking part in global research are finding that the current state of the available infrastructure in Africa is preventing them from being as active in international collaborations as they would like. AfricaConnect aims to remedy this by establishing a high-capacity Internet network for research and education in Southern and Eastern Africa. This will provide the region with a gateway to global research collaboration, making these collaborations as easy as possible.

The project brings together partners from all over Europe and Africa including the continent’s existing National Research and Education Networks (NRENs) alongside some of Europe’s. They are not alone, the project is being managed by DANTE (Delivery of Advanced Network Technology to Europe) with its counterparts the UbuntuNet Alliance and WACREN (West and Central African Research and Education Network). These three projects bring significant expertise in providing cutting edge networks and connecting European and African resources.

Over the next four years the project will work on building up the infrastructure so that by the end of the project the African partners will be able to maintain and improve the intra-regional African research network and its direct connection to international networks. The scheme should also accelerate the development of the Information Society in Africa, improving ordinary African’s access to IT and the global network.

Gearing up for IBERGRID’2011 in Santander

The 5th Iberian Grid Infrastructure conference – IBERGRID’2011 – will be held in Santander, Spain between 8-10 June 2011, at the Palacio de la Magdalena.

The event, hosted by the Advanced Computing and e-science Department at the Institute of Physics of Cantabria (CSIC-UC) and the Polytechnic University of Valencia, will focus on the on-going grid projects in development by Portuguese, Spanish and Latin American institutions.

“The IBERGRID conference has been established as the meeting point where researchers, technicians and developers of the area of distributed computing from Spain and Portugal gather once per year,” says Isabel Campos, chair of the conference’s organising committee.

“The attendance is very similar to that of a user forum – about half of the presentations are devoted to scientific applications running on the EGI infrastructure,” she adds. “Software developers and site administrators also typically come to IBERGRID, which became already sort of a tradition for the Iberian community.”

The IBERGRID’2011 programme is varied and covers topics such as green IT, large data repositories, LHC Computing Grid and Tier-0 topology, interactive supercomputing, applications for high performance networks, ESFRI implementations in the Iberian area or applications for volunteer computing.

This year the event will also include special tracks on virtualisation techniques and its applications, and on advanced management of computer centres.

The deadline for early registration is 10 May 2011.

http://www.ibergrid.eu/2011/index.html

 

 

Gearing up for IBERGRID’2011 in Santander

The 5th Iberian Grid Infrastructure conference – IBERGRID’2011 – will be held in Santander, Spain between 8-10 June 2011, at the Palacio de la Magdalena.

The event, hosted by the Advanced Computing and e-science Department at the Institute of Physics of Cantabria (CSIC-UC) and the Polytechnic University of Valencia, will focus on the on-going grid projects in development by Portuguese, Spanish and Latin American institutions.

“The IBERGRID conference has been established as the meeting point where researchers, technicians and developers of the area of distributed computing from Spain and Portugal gather once per year,” says Isabel Campos, chair of the conference’s organising committee.

“The attendance is very similar to that of a user forum – about half of the presentations are devoted to scientific applications running on the EGI infrastructure,” she adds. “Software developers and site administrators also typically come to IBERGRID, which became already sort of a tradition for the Iberian community.”

The IBERGRID’2011 programme is varied and covers topics such as green IT, large data repositories, LHC Computing Grid and Tier-0 topology, interactive supercomputing, applications for high performance networks, ESFRI implementations in the Iberian area or applications for volunteer computing.

This year the event will also include special tracks on virtualisation techniques and its applications, and on advanced management of computer centres.

The deadline for early registration is 10 May 2011.

http://www.ibergrid.eu/2011/index.html

 

 

New issue of newsletter is available

Spring 2011 edition of the Inspired newsletter

The Spring issue of Inspired, EGI's newsletter, was published today online and as a pdf.

The main focus of the Spring edition is the EGI User Forum in Vilnius held between 11-14 April. Viviane Li closes the curtain on the forum and Sy Holsinger tells us how the policy workshop went. Neasan O'Neill reviews the release of EMI 1 and I bring you a summary of the MoUs and SLAs signed at the User Forum. But that's not all.

Headlines

 If you want to contribute with ideas, suggestions or stories to the newsletter don't forget to let me know!

New issue of newsletter is available

Spring 2011 edition of the Inspired newsletter

The Spring issue of Inspired, EGI's newsletter, was published today online and as a pdf.

The main focus of the Spring edition is the EGI User Forum in Vilnius held between 11-14 April. Viviane Li closes the curtain on the forum and Sy Holsinger tells us how the policy workshop went. Neasan O'Neill reviews the release of EMI 1 and I bring you a summary of the MoUs and SLAs signed at the User Forum. But that's not all.

Headlines

 If you want to contribute with ideas, suggestions or stories to the newsletter don't forget to let me know!

EGI Repository

Το επίσημο repository του EGI διαθέτει σε τακτά χρονικά διαστήματα ενημερώσεις για το  Unified Middleware Distribution (UMD 1)

Περισσότερα στο http://repository.egi.eu

 

 

EDGI introduces new tools to submit thousands of jobs to the grid

At the EGI User Forum, held in Vilnius, Lithuania, the EDGI project successfully demonstrated the use of the new MetaJob feature, which enables user to submit jobs to the EDGI Desktop Grid through gLite using one single command. The new feature can be used to wrap or describe thousands of jobs into one single MetaJob.

“Desktop Grids are especially useful for applications like parameter sweeps where you have thousands and thousands of similar jobs,” explains Ad Emmen, from AlmereGrid. “MetaJob is a command line ‘script’ that helps an EGI user to create these jobs for his/her application, and submit them automatically through standard gLite interfaces.”

The efficiency of MetaJob was demonstrated with great success at the EDGI booth. During the day, the EDGI team submitted 10,000 jobs several times to show the EGI User Forum visitors how this can easily be processed by BOINC, without disrupting the gLite infrastructure.

For Jozsef Kovacs, from the MTA SZTAKI (the Computer and Automation Research Institute, Hungarian Academy of Sciences), MetaJob makes it easier to handle a high number of jobs. MetaJob also allows “to increase the scalability of the service grid to desktop grid bridging services deployed by the EDGI project by decreasing the load of the service grid components – for example gLite wms,” he adds.

From a technical point of view the solution is based on the well-known Service Cluster Grid to Desktop Grid bridge, where an extra MetaJob description file - containing the definition of a huge number of jobs - is attached to the job as input file. This MetaJob input file is recognised by the 3GBridge component, which then creates the jobs and inserts them into BOINC. This solution also works with XtremWeb on the Desktop Grid side or ARC on the Service/Cluster Grid side without any modification.

This work was performed in the framework of "Task JRA1.5: Solve Service/Cluster Grid to Desktop Grid bridge scalability issues" in the EDGI project.

"This successful EDGI demonstration clearly shows that Desktop Grids can be used effortlessly for scientific day-to-day calculations,” said Peter Kacsuk from the EDGI project. “The relevance of Desktop Grids for e-Science has been proven once and for all.”