e-IRG releases White Paper 2011

The 7th White Paper of the e-Infrastructure Reflection Group has been released this week. It addresses some interesting challenges for new and on-going e-Infrastructures in seven chapters.

Innovation is the common thread throughout, with emphasis on the governance of e-Infrastructures. “Existing e-Infrastructures need to look with a critical eye at their current governance model when preparing for innovation,” says Rosette Vandenbroucke, White Paper editor and e-IRG delegate. Are the governance models currently used sufficient to guarantee their future? Who should be the players in this model besides the service providers – the governments, the private sector, the user or a combination of these?

The document reflects upon the future role and development of Research networks and gives recommendations for policy makers.

It addresses the development of Authentication, Authorisation and Accounting, calling for new visions to realise the interworking and sustainability of the e-Infrastructure ecosystem.  

Energy and Green IT – efficient energy use, green energy, cheap energy, and energy consumption by ICT are daily topics on many management agendas. But is cheap energy compatible with green energy?

Supercomputing continues to spearhead innovation as countries and companies strive for the most powerful supercomputer. But can we go from T-flops to P-flops and can we efficiently use such computing power? Does a software revolution need to take place before supercomputing can make a leap forward?

Services are of growing importance, especially from a user’s perspective. Which services should be delivered and at what level of quality?

Finally, Data infrastructures are discussed, with a few suggestions for the set-up of European data infrastructures.

“The e-IRG White Paper 2011, especially the written recommendations in the end of every chapter, should be taken into consideration by governments, in particular ministries responsible for research, funding agencies and the European Commission. It is however also of interest to individual researchers and users of e-Infrastructures as an incentive to let their voices be heard”, Vandenbroucke concludes.


Visit the e-IRG website for more information, download the White Paper, and read a summary of comments gathered during the consultation phase in spring. You can also contact the e-IRG secretariat: secretariat@e-irg.eu

e-IRG releases White Paper 2011

The 7th White Paper of the e-Infrastructure Reflection Group has been released this week. It addresses some interesting challenges for new and on-going e-Infrastructures in seven chapters.

Innovation is the common thread throughout, with emphasis on the governance of e-Infrastructures. “Existing e-Infrastructures need to look with a critical eye at their current governance model when preparing for innovation,” says Rosette Vandenbroucke, White Paper editor and e-IRG delegate. Are the governance models currently used sufficient to guarantee their future? Who should be the players in this model besides the service providers – the governments, the private sector, the user or a combination of these?

The document reflects upon the future role and development of Research networks and gives recommendations for policy makers.

It addresses the development of Authentication, Authorisation and Accounting, calling for new visions to realise the interworking and sustainability of the e-Infrastructure ecosystem.  

Energy and Green IT – efficient energy use, green energy, cheap energy, and energy consumption by ICT are daily topics on many management agendas. But is cheap energy compatible with green energy?

Supercomputing continues to spearhead innovation as countries and companies strive for the most powerful supercomputer. But can we go from T-flops to P-flops and can we efficiently use such computing power? Does a software revolution need to take place before supercomputing can make a leap forward?

Services are of growing importance, especially from a user’s perspective. Which services should be delivered and at what level of quality?

Finally, Data infrastructures are discussed, with a few suggestions for the set-up of European data infrastructures.

“The e-IRG White Paper 2011, especially the written recommendations in the end of every chapter, should be taken into consideration by governments, in particular ministries responsible for research, funding agencies and the European Commission. It is however also of interest to individual researchers and users of e-Infrastructures as an incentive to let their voices be heard”, Vandenbroucke concludes.


Visit the e-IRG website for more information, download the White Paper, and read a summary of comments gathered during the consultation phase in spring. You can also contact the e-IRG secretariat: secretariat@e-irg.eu

Registration opens for the Lyon Technical Forum

Registration is now open for the Technical Forum (19‐23 September) in Lyon (http://go.egi.eu/tf11-registration). Early-bird registration fees apply until 5 August 2011.

A provisional timetable for the event it’s also now available.

The event will be hosted by EGI.eu, the Computing Centre of the National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Particle Physics (CC-IN2P3) and France Grilles, the French National Grid Initiative.

Registration is available for one, two or three days, or the full week including the conference dinner. The conference fees include access to all co-located events running on the day or days specified in the registration.

The co-located events include:

  • French Grid Day (en français) – 19 September

  • GlobusEUROPE – 19 September

  • SIENA workshop – 21 September

  • OGF33 – 19-21 September

  • Grid2011 – 22-23 September

The conference dinner is included in the full week registration fee. This year the Technical Forum dinner will be held on Wednesday 21 September at the L'Abbaye de Collonges. The restaurant is owned by Paul Bocuse, a Lyon-based chef with several Michelin stars to his name. The plan is to reach the restaurant by boat, so you will have the opportunity to enjoy a tour on the Saone River before dinner. If you’re not registering for the full week, you are welcome to add a ticket to the conference dinner during the registration process. More about the conference dinner.

Another activity taking place during the week is a visit to the new 900m2 computer room at the CC-IN2P3. The CC-IN2P3 will organise several visits to this new facility which will offer an even more powerful service to its research community, fulfilling particularly ambitious international commitments regarding the LHC project. More about the visit to the CC-IN2P3 computer room.

Registration opens for the Lyon Technical Forum

Registration is now open for the Technical Forum (19‐23 September) in Lyon (http://go.egi.eu/tf11-registration). Early-bird registration fees apply until 5 August 2011.

A provisional timetable for the event it’s also now available.

The event will be hosted by EGI.eu, the Computing Centre of the National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Particle Physics (CC-IN2P3) and France Grilles, the French National Grid Initiative.

Registration is available for one, two or three days, or the full week including the conference dinner. The conference fees include access to all co-located events running on the day or days specified in the registration.

The co-located events include:

  • French Grid Day (en français) – 19 September

  • GlobusEUROPE – 19 September

  • SIENA workshop – 21 September

  • OGF33 – 19-21 September

  • Grid2011 – 22-23 September

The conference dinner is included in the full week registration fee. This year the Technical Forum dinner will be held on Wednesday 21 September at the L'Abbaye de Collonges. The restaurant is owned by Paul Bocuse, a Lyon-based chef with several Michelin stars to his name. The plan is to reach the restaurant by boat, so you will have the opportunity to enjoy a tour on the Saone River before dinner. If you’re not registering for the full week, you are welcome to add a ticket to the conference dinner during the registration process. More about the conference dinner.

Another activity taking place during the week is a visit to the new 900m2 computer room at the CC-IN2P3. The CC-IN2P3 will organise several visits to this new facility which will offer an even more powerful service to its research community, fulfilling particularly ambitious international commitments regarding the LHC project. More about the visit to the CC-IN2P3 computer room.

EGI leverages best practices on Service Level Management

EGI signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) yesterday with the gSLM project to collaborate in bringing EGI’s Service Level Management in line with industry best practices.

The EGI project is interested in giving European scientists, and their international collaborators, access to a sustainable distributed computing service. However, the European grid has many stakeholders; resource owners, users, and administrators, and it can be difficult to bring all these viewpoints into focus. Thomas Schaaf from gSLM explains, “Even once you reach agreement on what needs to be done and how, it still isn’t easy. Documenting, managing and policing rights and responsibilities in a fair but enforceable way is extremely complex in an environment like the grid. We hope to help EGI improve their Service Level Management by bringing lessons learned by industry to bear on the problem”.

The MoU, signed at ISC’11 in Hamburg, formalises the collaboration between EGI and gSLM so that the two can work together to provide concrete plans that can help shape the future of the infrastructure. Sergio Andreozzi has been working with gSLM to define the details of the collaboration plan, “Leveraging the experience and the best practices of Service Level Management from the commercial sector is just one more step towards improving EGI overall services. The gSLM project will bring the needed expertise to understand what can be improved and how”.

Some of the most important results of the collaboration will include:

  • Defining everyone’s role within EGI in relation to delivering a service to EGI users. This will mean that everyone within the project understand their place within the schema along with what is expected of them and what they can expect from others.

  • Creating a list of the current obstacles and requirements that the service providers have for providing services to users. EGI needs to know what are the issues for resource providers, this list will allow them to tackle these problems and hopefully make supporting new users as easy as possible.

  • Discovering the obstacles and requirements that existing and potential users have accessing grid services. Solving the problems being encountered by users now will help the project understand what needs to be done to make the grid more attractive to new users.

  • Building a training programme to improve the project’s IT Service Management. For EGI to gain from the collaboration with gSLM the lessons learned need to be disseminated as wide as possible. The training programme will do this alongside as explaining the new processes being used by the project.

The activity will start immediately by harmonising the terminology used and planning for a training session on IT Service Management at the next EGI Technical Forum.
 

EGI leverages best practices on Service Level Management

EGI signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) yesterday with the gSLM project to collaborate in bringing EGI’s Service Level Management in line with industry best practices.

The EGI project is interested in giving European scientists, and their international collaborators, access to a sustainable distributed computing service. However, the European grid has many stakeholders; resource owners, users, and administrators, and it can be difficult to bring all these viewpoints into focus. Thomas Schaaf from gSLM explains, “Even once you reach agreement on what needs to be done and how, it still isn’t easy. Documenting, managing and policing rights and responsibilities in a fair but enforceable way is extremely complex in an environment like the grid. We hope to help EGI improve their Service Level Management by bringing lessons learned by industry to bear on the problem”.

The MoU, signed at ISC’11 in Hamburg, formalises the collaboration between EGI and gSLM so that the two can work together to provide concrete plans that can help shape the future of the infrastructure. Sergio Andreozzi has been working with gSLM to define the details of the collaboration plan, “Leveraging the experience and the best practices of Service Level Management from the commercial sector is just one more step towards improving EGI overall services. The gSLM project will bring the needed expertise to understand what can be improved and how”.

Some of the most important results of the collaboration will include:

  • Defining everyone’s role within EGI in relation to delivering a service to EGI users. This will mean that everyone within the project understand their place within the schema along with what is expected of them and what they can expect from others.

  • Creating a list of the current obstacles and requirements that the service providers have for providing services to users. EGI needs to know what are the issues for resource providers, this list will allow them to tackle these problems and hopefully make supporting new users as easy as possible.

  • Discovering the obstacles and requirements that existing and potential users have accessing grid services. Solving the problems being encountered by users now will help the project understand what needs to be done to make the grid more attractive to new users.

  • Building a training programme to improve the project’s IT Service Management. For EGI to gain from the collaboration with gSLM the lessons learned need to be disseminated as wide as possible. The training programme will do this alongside as explaining the new processes being used by the project.

The activity will start immediately by harmonising the terminology used and planning for a training session on IT Service Management at the next EGI Technical Forum.
 

Bringing life to the grid

Last month marked another step forward for the European Grid Infrastructure as they signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the Life Science Grid Community (LSGC). The MoU will solidify the relationship between the two, bringing benefits to all grid users.

Biomedical research was one of the first communities, after high energy physics, to embrace grid technology. Yannick Legre the president of HealthGrid, the organisation co-ordinating LSGC, recognises the benefits the grid has had on their work "The European grid has been instrumental in the work we do. We have been able to offer researchers resources that they could usually only dream of, enabling research into some of the most exciting areas of biomedicine. We are really happy to formalise our relationship with EGI and look forward to working with them on providing an infrastructure for our members".

The agreement provides a joint work plan covering; user support, operations, outreach, requirement gathering and policies and procedures. Collaborating on these areas will ensure that the two can work together to improve the services they offer.

Steve Brewer EGI's Chief Community Officer believes that this is an important agreement for the project "EGI is providing an infrastructure for research in Europe. To do this we need to work with every discipline and discover their wants and needs. The life sciences have a very different view of the technology to a group like particle physicists, making the grid work for them will only improve the grid experience for them and others. I am delighted that we have been able to bring that community on-board so quickly. I think it is proof that we have something to offer everyone".

Sergio Andreozzi, Policy Development Manager at EGI, supported the negotiation process and welcomes the final signature "this agreement is another important milestone in the EGI strategy of establishing long-term relationships with diverse virtual research communities, thus expanding the user base and connecting them. More agreements with various actors are nearing the finish line and will be announced in the coming weeks".

Bringing life to the grid

Last month marked another step forward for the European Grid Infrastructure as they signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the Life Science Grid Community (LSGC). The MoU will solidify the relationship between the two, bringing benefits to all grid users.

Biomedical research was one of the first communities, after high energy physics, to embrace grid technology. Yannick Legre the president of HealthGrid, the organisation co-ordinating LSGC, recognises the benefits the grid has had on their work "The European grid has been instrumental in the work we do. We have been able to offer researchers resources that they could usually only dream of, enabling research into some of the most exciting areas of biomedicine. We are really happy to formalise our relationship with EGI and look forward to working with them on providing an infrastructure for our members".

The agreement provides a joint work plan covering; user support, operations, outreach, requirement gathering and policies and procedures. Collaborating on these areas will ensure that the two can work together to improve the services they offer.

Steve Brewer EGI's Chief Community Officer believes that this is an important agreement for the project "EGI is providing an infrastructure for research in Europe. To do this we need to work with every discipline and discover their wants and needs. The life sciences have a very different view of the technology to a group like particle physicists, making the grid work for them will only improve the grid experience for them and others. I am delighted that we have been able to bring that community on-board so quickly. I think it is proof that we have something to offer everyone".

Sergio Andreozzi, Policy Development Manager at EGI, supported the negotiation process and welcomes the final signature "this agreement is another important milestone in the EGI strategy of establishing long-term relationships with diverse virtual research communities, thus expanding the user base and connecting them. More agreements with various actors are nearing the finish line and will be announced in the coming weeks".