EGI at Supercomputing’11

EGI will be at the Supercomputing exhibition in Seattle USA from 14 to 17 November, booth 4005 on level 6.

If you are attending, come over and say hello! We have lots of information about the European grid and goodies such as T-shirts, bags and stickers to giveaway.

We won't be alone! The European distributed computing community will be well represented at the event.

The European Middleware Initiative, one of EGI's technology providers, can be found at booth 763 very close to the Italian Grid Infrastructure (IGI), the Italian NGI (booth 757). The Leibniz Supercomputing Centre & the MNM team, the hosts of the 2012 EGI Community Forum, are at booth 229 and 5111 respectively, the Nordugrid collaboration is at booth 2118 and the Computing Centre of the National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Particle Physics (CC-IN2P3) will be at 4014.

We will be report on the event on the EGI blog and our brand new Facebook page. Follow us!

EGI at Supercomputing’11

EGI will be at the Supercomputing exhibition in Seattle USA from 14 to 17 November, booth 4005 on level 6.

If you are attending, come over and say hello! We have lots of information about the European grid and goodies such as T-shirts, bags and stickers to giveaway.

We won't be alone! The European distributed computing community will be well represented at the event.

The European Middleware Initiative, one of EGI's technology providers, can be found at booth 763 very close to the Italian Grid Infrastructure (IGI), the Italian NGI (booth 757). The Leibniz Supercomputing Centre & the MNM team, the hosts of the 2012 EGI Community Forum, are at booth 229 and 5111 respectively, the Nordugrid collaboration is at booth 2118 and the Computing Centre of the National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Particle Physics (CC-IN2P3) will be at 4014.

We will be report on the event on the EGI blog and our brand new Facebook page. Follow us!

The Autumn 2011 edition of the EGI newsletter is now out

Inspired newsletter: Autumn 2011

The Autumn 2011 issue of the EGI Inspired newsletter was published today, 1 November, and is also available in pdf format.

This issue's features:

Plus:

If you want to contribute with ideas, suggestions or stories to the newsletter don't forget to let us know at press@egi.eu
 

The Autumn 2011 edition of the EGI newsletter is now out

Inspired newsletter: Autumn 2011

The Autumn 2011 issue of the EGI Inspired newsletter was published today, 1 November, and is also available in pdf format.

This issue's features:

Plus:

If you want to contribute with ideas, suggestions or stories to the newsletter don't forget to let us know at press@egi.eu
 

Community Forum 2012 – the call for abstracts is open

Community Forum poster

The countdown for the first EGI Community Forum has started and the call for participation is now open.

The event will take place at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) in Munich, Germany between 26-30 March 2012. The event will be hosted by EGI.eu in partnership with the Munich Network Management, a consortium of four German research institutions, and will be held in conjunction with the second EMI Technical Conference.

The forum will highlight the services, technologies and tools available to scientific communities to better support their research.

The organisers invite all members of the community to submit abstracts for presentations, demonstrations, posters and workshops. The deadline for submissions is 2 December, 2011.

The programme committee, chaired by Steve Brewer EGI.eu’s Chief Community Officer, welcomes abstracts in the following areas:

  • Users and communities, their requirements and achievements. Submissions that address the sustainability of different models for the structure of user communities whether large, small, diverse or specialised, will be particularly welcome.

  • Software services for users and communities.

  • Middleware services.

  • Operational services and infrastructure.

  • Coordination and Communication.

The Community Forum will take place in the facilities of the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) and at the Faculty of Mathematics and Informatics (FMI) building, famous for its indoor slides.

Sadly, the Forum will miss the Oktoberfest, but will coincide with the ‘strong beer season’. The tradition of brewing strong beer dates from the Middle Ages, when the local monasteries brew nutritious beers in late winter, so that they could survive Lent with no ill effects. The enjoyment of strong beer was not regarded as a sin: “Liquid nourishment doesn’t break your fast”. The tradition of strong beer lives on to this day.
 

Community Forum 2012 – the call for abstracts is open

Community Forum poster

The countdown for the first EGI Community Forum has started and the call for participation is now open.

The event will take place at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) in Munich, Germany between 26-30 March 2012. The event will be hosted by EGI.eu in partnership with the Munich Network Management, a consortium of four German research institutions, and will be held in conjunction with the second EMI Technical Conference.

The forum will highlight the services, technologies and tools available to scientific communities to better support their research.

The organisers invite all members of the community to submit abstracts for presentations, demonstrations, posters and workshops. The deadline for submissions is 2 December, 2011.

The programme committee, chaired by Steve Brewer EGI.eu’s Chief Community Officer, welcomes abstracts in the following areas:

  • Users and communities, their requirements and achievements. Submissions that address the sustainability of different models for the structure of user communities whether large, small, diverse or specialised, will be particularly welcome.

  • Software services for users and communities.

  • Middleware services.

  • Operational services and infrastructure.

  • Coordination and Communication.

The Community Forum will take place in the facilities of the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) and at the Faculty of Mathematics and Informatics (FMI) building, famous for its indoor slides.

Sadly, the Forum will miss the Oktoberfest, but will coincide with the ‘strong beer season’. The tradition of brewing strong beer dates from the Middle Ages, when the local monasteries brew nutritious beers in late winter, so that they could survive Lent with no ill effects. The enjoyment of strong beer was not regarded as a sin: “Liquid nourishment doesn’t break your fast”. The tradition of strong beer lives on to this day.
 

EGI.eu joins HealthGrid and IWSG-Life 2012 Conferences

EGI.eu is pleased to announce its participation in the HealthGrid 2012 Conference and the 4th International Workshop on Science Gateways for Life Sciences.

This joint event will take place at the Amsterdam Medical Centre in The Netherlands from 21 to 25 May 2012 (Monday to Friday).

The conferences present an opportunity for speakers to introduce and share novel ideas for the integration of grid, cloud and other e-infrastructures into the fields of biology, bioinformatics, biomedicine and healthcare, focusing on fundamental and practical aspects of middleware, technologies, applications and deployment issues.

For EGI.eu in particular, this represents an invaluable chance to interact directly with a vitally important sector of the community of researchers and developers that use grid computing resources. As a result, EGI.eu aims to use this opportunity to explore and gather new requirements for future development of our infrastructure and to better understand the needs of today’s users.

Calls for Papers are now open for HealthGrid 2012 and IWSG-Life2012. The conferences welcome contributions covering topics that range from grid technologies through to biomedical research and from portals to workflow and computational modelling.

 

EGI.eu joins HealthGrid and IWSG-Life 2012 Conferences

EGI.eu is pleased to announce its participation in the HealthGrid 2012 Conference and the 4th International Workshop on Science Gateways for Life Sciences.

This joint event will take place at the Amsterdam Medical Centre in The Netherlands from 21 to 25 May 2012 (Monday to Friday).

The conferences present an opportunity for speakers to introduce and share novel ideas for the integration of grid, cloud and other e-infrastructures into the fields of biology, bioinformatics, biomedicine and healthcare, focusing on fundamental and practical aspects of middleware, technologies, applications and deployment issues.

For EGI.eu in particular, this represents an invaluable chance to interact directly with a vitally important sector of the community of researchers and developers that use grid computing resources. As a result, EGI.eu aims to use this opportunity to explore and gather new requirements for future development of our infrastructure and to better understand the needs of today’s users.

Calls for Papers are now open for HealthGrid 2012 and IWSG-Life2012. The conferences welcome contributions covering topics that range from grid technologies through to biomedical research and from portals to workflow and computational modelling.

 

How fast could a T-rex run?

And, more importantly, was it fast enough to catch you?

Grid computing is helping palaeontologists to understand better how dinosaurs moved around and what roles they played in their ancient world.

With its sharp teeth and massive jaws, the T-rex is the stuff of nightmares. It’s not surprising that scientists are convinced the T-rex was a carnivorous predator but huge teeth don’t tell the whole story. Was it like the modern cheetah and catch its prey in short burst-like sprints? Or was the T-rex a sneaky stalk-and-ambush hunter like the jaguar? What was its place in the Cretaceous ecosystem?

Since we can’t see a real T-rex in action (it disappeared along with the other dinosaurs 65 million years ago), palaeontologists need to look elsewhere to understand its role as a predator. Top running speed offers good clues to solving this mystery – but how do you measure the maximum speed of an extinct animal?

If zebras were to become extinct, the palaeontologists of the future could probably use horses or donkeys as comparisons. People looking at dinosaur behaviour don’t have that luxury because there is nothing alive today quite like a T-rex. The solution is to create a detailed computer simulation of the animal’s skeleton and muscles.

Continue reading...

How fast could a T-rex run?

And, more importantly, was it fast enough to catch you?

Grid computing is helping palaeontologists to understand better how dinosaurs moved around and what roles they played in their ancient world.

With its sharp teeth and massive jaws, the T-rex is the stuff of nightmares. It’s not surprising that scientists are convinced the T-rex was a carnivorous predator but huge teeth don’t tell the whole story. Was it like the modern cheetah and catch its prey in short burst-like sprints? Or was the T-rex a sneaky stalk-and-ambush hunter like the jaguar? What was its place in the Cretaceous ecosystem?

Since we can’t see a real T-rex in action (it disappeared along with the other dinosaurs 65 million years ago), palaeontologists need to look elsewhere to understand its role as a predator. Top running speed offers good clues to solving this mystery – but how do you measure the maximum speed of an extinct animal?

If zebras were to become extinct, the palaeontologists of the future could probably use horses or donkeys as comparisons. People looking at dinosaur behaviour don’t have that luxury because there is nothing alive today quite like a T-rex. The solution is to create a detailed computer simulation of the animal’s skeleton and muscles.

Continue reading...