Last week to submit papers to the EGI Community Forum

If you want to submit an abstract to the EGI Community Forum, this is the time to do it: submissions will close on Friday, 2nd December. The forum will be held in Munich (26-30 March 2012), in conjunction with the 2nd EMI Technical Conference and the European Globus Community Forum.

We welcome submissions of individual poster, presentation or demonstrations which will be reviewed by the programme committee and placed into the programme. Requests for community workshops, training activities and internal project meetings are welcomed and will be
accommodated subject to availability.

Submissions will be selected according to their applicability to the following five tracks:

  • Users and communities

  • Software services for users and communities

  • Middleware services

  • Operational services and infrastructure

  • Coordination and communication

The five tracks reflect the evolution of the infrastructure towards a sustainable layered model together with the advancements in the deployed middleware services which will offer a more flexible and versatile mechanism for meeting the needs of the increasingly diverse user community. The overall goal of the Community Forum and Technical Conference is to both increase and improve use of the infrastructure as well as to further enhance its middleware services.

A second stage reviewing process will be announced later which will lead to the publication of selected papers. Accepted peer-reviewed papers will be published in an open-access online journal.

More information

 

Last week to submit papers to the EGI Community Forum

If you want to submit an abstract to the EGI Community Forum, this is the time to do it: submissions will close on Friday, 2nd December. The forum will be held in Munich (26-30 March 2012), in conjunction with the 2nd EMI Technical Conference and the European Globus Community Forum.

We welcome submissions of individual poster, presentation or demonstrations which will be reviewed by the programme committee and placed into the programme. Requests for community workshops, training activities and internal project meetings are welcomed and will be
accommodated subject to availability.

Submissions will be selected according to their applicability to the following five tracks:

  • Users and communities

  • Software services for users and communities

  • Middleware services

  • Operational services and infrastructure

  • Coordination and communication

The five tracks reflect the evolution of the infrastructure towards a sustainable layered model together with the advancements in the deployed middleware services which will offer a more flexible and versatile mechanism for meeting the needs of the increasingly diverse user community. The overall goal of the Community Forum and Technical Conference is to both increase and improve use of the infrastructure as well as to further enhance its middleware services.

A second stage reviewing process will be announced later which will lead to the publication of selected papers. Accepted peer-reviewed papers will be published in an open-access online journal.

More information

 

EGI signs agreements with EDGI and SHIWA

Peter Kacsuk and Steven Newhouse signing the agreements

Last Tuesday, 22 November, Steven Newhouse signed two Memoranda of Understanding (MoU) on behalf of EGI with the EDGI (European Desktop Grid Initiative) and the SHIWA (SHaring Interoperable Workflows for large-scale scientific simulations on Available DCIs) projects, both represented by Péter Kacsuk.

EDGI is a project developed to deploy desktop grid (DG) and cloud services for EGI heavy user communities. The project will provide a workflow-oriented science gateway to enable easier access to the e-infrastructure and establish the International Desktop Grid Federation (IDGF) to coordinate DG-related activities in Europe and to attract volunteer DG resource donors.

With this agreement, the EDGI production infrastructure will be offered as service for EGI and NGI user communities, “thus enabling and exploiting the possibilities lying within volunteer and institutional desktop grid computing for a wider scientific user community,” says Kacsuk.

The SHIWA project's main goal is to leverage existing workflow based solutions and enable cross-workflow and inter-workflow exploitation of DCIs by applying both coarse- and fine-grained strategies. Kacsuk hopes that the collaboration with EGI will bring SHIWA services to a wider range of communities. And also, “by using SHIWA services EGI community can provide feedback for SHIWA consortium to further improve services,” he adds.

The technology solution provided by SHIWA will enhance interoperability between different workflow communities with different types of workflows, thus enabling more effective collaborations.

At the same occasion, Kacsuk also signed a MoU between EDGI and the e-ScienceTalk project represented by Catherine Gater.

 

EGI signs agreements with EDGI and SHIWA

Peter Kacsuk and Steven Newhouse signing the agreements

Last Tuesday, 22 November, Steven Newhouse signed two Memoranda of Understanding (MoU) on behalf of EGI with the EDGI (European Desktop Grid Initiative) and the SHIWA (SHaring Interoperable Workflows for large-scale scientific simulations on Available DCIs) projects, both represented by Péter Kacsuk.

EDGI is a project developed to deploy desktop grid (DG) and cloud services for EGI heavy user communities. The project will provide a workflow-oriented science gateway to enable easier access to the e-infrastructure and establish the International Desktop Grid Federation (IDGF) to coordinate DG-related activities in Europe and to attract volunteer DG resource donors.

With this agreement, the EDGI production infrastructure will be offered as service for EGI and NGI user communities, “thus enabling and exploiting the possibilities lying within volunteer and institutional desktop grid computing for a wider scientific user community,” says Kacsuk.

The SHIWA project's main goal is to leverage existing workflow based solutions and enable cross-workflow and inter-workflow exploitation of DCIs by applying both coarse- and fine-grained strategies. Kacsuk hopes that the collaboration with EGI will bring SHIWA services to a wider range of communities. And also, “by using SHIWA services EGI community can provide feedback for SHIWA consortium to further improve services,” he adds.

The technology solution provided by SHIWA will enhance interoperability between different workflow communities with different types of workflows, thus enabling more effective collaborations.

At the same occasion, Kacsuk also signed a MoU between EDGI and the e-ScienceTalk project represented by Catherine Gater.

 

The Grid presents: ‘The Sound of Tweets’ at SC’11

Today Domenico Vicinanza from DANTE presented a new grid-enabled musical composition in a special performance live from the Supercomputing’11 exhibition in Seattle. For this piece, Domenico transformed all the tweets tagged with #SC11 between 11:00 and 11:15 (Seattle time) into one beautiful piece of music using his sonification technique.

But how does that work?

“Sonification, in general terms, is the acoustic counterpart of the graphical data representation,” Domenico explains. “In other words, it is the representation of data or by means of audible information.”

Domenico attributed a specific musical note to each letter of the alphabet and assigned a duration to the notes – vowels lasted a quaver (1/8) and consonants a semiquaver (1/16). The data was sent via the Scinet (the Supercomputing event’s network) to the European Grid Infrastructure, via the GÉANT network, and analysed by a grid-enabled sonification package available on the GILDA infrastructure.

You can hear a sample of the resulting musical piece in this mp3 file. And in a few weeks we’ll update this news item with a video of the presentation Domenico gave at the event, featuring the full-length performance.
 

The Grid presents: ‘The Sound of Tweets’ at SC’11

Today Domenico Vicinanza from DANTE presented a new grid-enabled musical composition in a special performance live from the Supercomputing’11 exhibition in Seattle. For this piece, Domenico transformed all the tweets tagged with #SC11 between 11:00 and 11:15 (Seattle time) into one beautiful piece of music using his sonification technique.

But how does that work?

“Sonification, in general terms, is the acoustic counterpart of the graphical data representation,” Domenico explains. “In other words, it is the representation of data or by means of audible information.”

Domenico attributed a specific musical note to each letter of the alphabet and assigned a duration to the notes – vowels lasted a quaver (1/8) and consonants a semiquaver (1/16). The data was sent via the Scinet (the Supercomputing event’s network) to the European Grid Infrastructure, via the GÉANT network, and analysed by a grid-enabled sonification package available on the GILDA infrastructure.

You can hear a sample of the resulting musical piece in this mp3 file. And in a few weeks we’ll update this news item with a video of the presentation Domenico gave at the event, featuring the full-length performance.
 

e-Science Café Roadshow launches in Hungary

The first e-Science Café Roadshow was held on the 14th November in Budapest and it was organised by MTA SZTAKI.

The event built on the success of the Hungarian Café Grid in March 2011, which proved that there is a need for events explaining what e-science is and which e-infrastructures are available within Hungary.

The event was hosted by the Obuda University, which is a new candidate for NGI_HU. The invited speakers represented Hungary’s main research institutes and universities including Budapest University of Technology and Economics, KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, National Information Infrastructure Development Institute, SZTAKI Laboratory of Parallel and Distributed Systems.

The topics covered at the event included GPGPU, HPC, grids and desktop grids, as well as clouds. We had 51 participants at this free event, fuelling intense and productive discussions after each presentation. From the feedback results we received, the event can be considered highly successful (5.45 on the scale of 1-6).

The roadshow team has already received inquiries on the next location, so discussions have already started about the next event. The candidates are Szeged, Szekesfehervar, Gyor and Debrecen, cities all well-known in Hungary for their universities. There are also plans to include tutorials and hands-ons to the following events’ schedule.

Our aim is to create a brand with these roadshows, target a wider audience and introduce NGI_HU and the services we can offer to the scientific community.
 

e-Science Café Roadshow launches in Hungary

The first e-Science Café Roadshow was held on the 14th November in Budapest and it was organised by MTA SZTAKI.

The event built on the success of the Hungarian Café Grid in March 2011, which proved that there is a need for events explaining what e-science is and which e-infrastructures are available within Hungary.

The event was hosted by the Obuda University, which is a new candidate for NGI_HU. The invited speakers represented Hungary’s main research institutes and universities including Budapest University of Technology and Economics, KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, National Information Infrastructure Development Institute, SZTAKI Laboratory of Parallel and Distributed Systems.

The topics covered at the event included GPGPU, HPC, grids and desktop grids, as well as clouds. We had 51 participants at this free event, fuelling intense and productive discussions after each presentation. From the feedback results we received, the event can be considered highly successful (5.45 on the scale of 1-6).

The roadshow team has already received inquiries on the next location, so discussions have already started about the next event. The candidates are Szeged, Szekesfehervar, Gyor and Debrecen, cities all well-known in Hungary for their universities. There are also plans to include tutorials and hands-ons to the following events’ schedule.

Our aim is to create a brand with these roadshows, target a wider audience and introduce NGI_HU and the services we can offer to the scientific community.
 

The UK National Grid Service adopts Globus Online

SC11, Seattle, WA, USA -- Nov. 15, 2011 -- The United Kingdom’s National Grid Service (NGS) has adopted Globus Online as the preferred data movement method for its users.

All computing resources available to the NGS community have been added as transfer endpoints in the Globus Online system, a hosted service for high performance data movement, and NGS has been enabled as an identity provider for the service. Using their NGS credentials, users can quickly and easily log in to Globus Online and move files among NGS servers, or between an NGS server and the user’s local server or laptop.

“We aim through the availability of this service to ensure that our users can quickly and easily access the data they need, regardless of the size or location of the data volume,” said David Wallom, NGS Technical Director. “The process to move large volumes of raw information from resources that have generated it, back to the user who needs to manipulate and analyse the results, can be not only time-consuming but also difficult and frustrating for researchers. Enabling Globus Online for NGS data movement will provide a significant value-added service that I know will benefit our users.”

Dr. Wallom further explained, “By using a web-based service, we are also ensuring users will have minimum interaction with what they might consider complex ICT tools and technologies -- whilst giving them access to a sophisticated yet easy-to-use capability.”

Globus Online is a secure, reliable file transfer service that makes it easy to move datasets of any size, whether between supercomputing facilities or from a facility to a local server or personal computer, without requiring custom end-to-end systems.

“We are very happy to provide this service for the hundreds of researchers who rely on NGS resources,” said Ian Foster, Director of the Computation Institute at University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory, home to Globus Online. “With the increased capacity for sharing and collaboration that Globus Online provides, NGS users should be able to better focus on their research without the distraction of having to worry about how to move files from here to there.”

A detailed tutorial about using Globus Online with NGS is available at http://www.ngs.ac.uk/globus-online-tutorial

UK NGS users can sign up for a free Globus Online account at https://www.globusonline.org/.

The UK National Grid Service adopts Globus Online

SC11, Seattle, WA, USA -- Nov. 15, 2011 -- The United Kingdom’s National Grid Service (NGS) has adopted Globus Online as the preferred data movement method for its users.

All computing resources available to the NGS community have been added as transfer endpoints in the Globus Online system, a hosted service for high performance data movement, and NGS has been enabled as an identity provider for the service. Using their NGS credentials, users can quickly and easily log in to Globus Online and move files among NGS servers, or between an NGS server and the user’s local server or laptop.

“We aim through the availability of this service to ensure that our users can quickly and easily access the data they need, regardless of the size or location of the data volume,” said David Wallom, NGS Technical Director. “The process to move large volumes of raw information from resources that have generated it, back to the user who needs to manipulate and analyse the results, can be not only time-consuming but also difficult and frustrating for researchers. Enabling Globus Online for NGS data movement will provide a significant value-added service that I know will benefit our users.”

Dr. Wallom further explained, “By using a web-based service, we are also ensuring users will have minimum interaction with what they might consider complex ICT tools and technologies -- whilst giving them access to a sophisticated yet easy-to-use capability.”

Globus Online is a secure, reliable file transfer service that makes it easy to move datasets of any size, whether between supercomputing facilities or from a facility to a local server or personal computer, without requiring custom end-to-end systems.

“We are very happy to provide this service for the hundreds of researchers who rely on NGS resources,” said Ian Foster, Director of the Computation Institute at University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory, home to Globus Online. “With the increased capacity for sharing and collaboration that Globus Online provides, NGS users should be able to better focus on their research without the distraction of having to worry about how to move files from here to there.”

A detailed tutorial about using Globus Online with NGS is available at http://www.ngs.ac.uk/globus-online-tutorial

UK NGS users can sign up for a free Globus Online account at https://www.globusonline.org/.