EGI video about cone snails premieres in Taipei

Stories from the grid - episode 1 (video)

Today the European Grid Infrastructure (EGI) launched their new online video series “Stories from the grid” at the International Symposium on Grids and Clouds in Taipei. The first episode is about how a component of the toxic venom used by the cone snail is being modified using the aid of computer models to help produce new anaesthetics and alleviate the muscle spasms caused by the condition dystonia.

EGI is a pan-European project providing access to computing resources for researchers through a distributed computing infrastructure called a grid. The diverse range of science supported by EGI is being showcased in the series of short online videos. Each episode focuses on a particular piece of research that would have been near impossible without EGI.

The first video looks at how Henry Hocking from the CONCO project (see www.conco.eu) has used the grid to analyse naturally occurring molecules in venoms used by marine snails to immobilise their prey. They hope to be able to use their work to synthesise an artificial molecule that specifically targets and blocks the transmission of pain signals to create better muscle relaxants that have anaesthetic properties. “At the end of the day we just want to get our work done,” explains Henry, ”but science has changed and computing has become integral to what we do on a daily basis. Without the resources provided through EGI we would not be at the stage we are today.“

EGI prides itself on providing expert computing without the need to be a computer expert. So to help CONCO use the grid, EGI worked closely with the WeNMR project. “We have been working on the European grid since 2009,” explains Alexandre Bonvin from WeNMR, who is also featured in the video. “In that time we have developed tools to ensure that scientists coming to us get up and running as soon as possible. They are not interested in having to spend weeks getting to grips with a new technology, they just want their results.”

The video was premiered during Alexandre Bonvin’s keynote speech at the International Symposium on Grids and Clouds in Taipei this morning. The first episode of Stories from the grid, “The cone snail and the search for powerful new anaesthetics”, can be seen at http://go.egi.eu/conco

 

Ibergrid publishes 2011 Annual Report

Ibergrid has published its first annual report, which is available for download in .pdf format.

Ibergrid was set up in May 2010 as an umbrella organisation for INGRID and ES-NGI,  the Portuguese and Spanish National Grid Initiatives. The organisation offers aggregated computing power of more than 24,000 cores and 20 Petabytes of online storage available 24/7 and supports scientists in many fields of research, including High Energy Physics, Computational Chemistry, Engineering and Nuclear Fusion. The usage of Ibergrid resources has doubled over the past year, reaching 124 million CPU hours in December 2011.

But what are Portuguese and Spanish researchers doing with these resources? The Ibergrid Annual Report answers the question in great detail listing more than 20 pages of use cases and practical applications of grid computing to research in Portugal and Spain, from the ECO-SELFE model (already featured as a case study in this website) to contributions to Computational Chemistry and the Life Sciences.

 

 

Ibergrid publishes 2011 Annual Report

Ibergrid has published its first annual report, which is available for download in .pdf format.

Ibergrid was set up in May 2010 as an umbrella organisation for INGRID and ES-NGI,  the Portuguese and Spanish National Grid Initiatives. The organisation offers aggregated computing power of more than 24,000 cores and 20 Petabytes of online storage available 24/7 and supports scientists in many fields of research, including High Energy Physics, Computational Chemistry, Engineering and Nuclear Fusion. The usage of Ibergrid resources has doubled over the past year, reaching 124 million CPU hours in December 2011.

But what are Portuguese and Spanish researchers doing with these resources? The Ibergrid Annual Report answers the question in great detail listing more than 20 pages of use cases and practical applications of grid computing to research in Portugal and Spain, from the ECO-SELFE model (already featured as a case study in this website) to contributions to Computational Chemistry and the Life Sciences.

 

 

The Winter 2012 edition of the EGI newsletter is now out

Inspired newsletter: Winter 2012

The Winter 2012 issue of the EGI Inspired newsletter is now out and is also available in pdf format.

This edition features a preview of the Community Forum's programme by Richard McLennan and an overview of the Training Workshops by John Walsh. Steven Newhouse celebrates EGI.eu's second anniversary, Neasan O'Neill tells us how EGI is engaging with several social network,Viviane Li announces who won the mascot competition and Sara Coelho reports on how grid computing is helping the search for new virus species. But that's not all:

The Winter 2012 edition of the EGI newsletter is now out

Inspired newsletter: Winter 2012

The Winter 2012 issue of the EGI Inspired newsletter is now out and is also available in pdf format.

This edition features a preview of the Community Forum's programme by Richard McLennan and an overview of the Training Workshops by John Walsh. Steven Newhouse celebrates EGI.eu's second anniversary, Neasan O'Neill tells us how EGI is engaging with several social network,Viviane Li announces who won the mascot competition and Sara Coelho reports on how grid computing is helping the search for new virus species. But that's not all:

Announcing the Cloudscape IV conference

Cloudscape IV – Advances in Interoperability & Cloud Computing Standards

Cloud computing is moving at an incredibly fast pace, calling for more flexible and swifter responses not only to address adoption barriers but also take up of new opportunities. In the scientific arena, data intensive problems are gaining significant success with cloud computing as they have the closely coupled structure well supported in clouds and are typically “new applications” that are attractive to build from scratch with programming models suited for clouds.

While cloud may not be a magic wand for all situations requiring some form of distributed computing, we are getting closer to understanding where it works best in scientific settings. However, a great deal of work remains to be done in achieving interoperability and portability of data to avoid vendor lock-in and build choice so scientists, governments and citizens can decide which technologies work best for them. Data protection is a hot topic that needs addressing at policy level as one of the three pillars underpinning the European Union’s cloud computing strategy to create a legal framework regulating users’ rights.

Cloudscape IV, 23-24 February at the European Commission in Brussels, aims to drive forward the priority actions captured in the SIENA Roadmap by placing interoperability, data portability, legal impediments and security high on the agenda. Industry views come from several large enterprises at the forefront of cloud computing to help foster standards implementation for interoperability and data portability in the light of on-going and future work. A Call to Action is supported by major standards bodies in response to current and emerging requirements. “Through the flagship Cloudscape workshops, SIENA offers a forum to track emerging standards and technologies, evaluate impediments and raise greater awareness of this dynamic and complex landscape, said Silvana Muscella, Technical Coordinator of the SIENA initiative, which is funded by the Commission’s GÉANT and e-Infrastructures Unit.

On the international front, Cloudscape IV will seek to blaze a trail for stronger international cooperation on global challenges. The workshop host, the SIENA initiative, will be seeking to build on synergies with the US National Institute of Standards (NIST) the US National Science Foundation, and the Global Inter-Cloud Technology Forum (GICTF), a Japanese-led initiative. Insights into cloud computing in Brazil will also shed light on global developments paving the way for new cooperation partnerships with Europe. European perspectives shine the spotlight on cloud computing for the Digital Agenda, with a keynote from Mario Campolargo, Director DG INFSO Emerging Technologies and Infrastructures, European Commission. Other perspectives will focus on re-usable assets of distributed computing infrastructures, insights into use cases for e-research and government, new cloud partnerships, research and development and initiatives like EuroCIOs and EuroCloud.

The multi-stakeholder dialogue will thus seek to define steps for the public and private sector dialogue in an effort to overcome barriers, stimulate uptake and innovation so as to reap the full potential of cloud computing in Europe. “We hope that our roadmap will heighten awareness and reinforce the importance and value of sustainable e-infrastructure providing vital services to a broader research user base In Europe and internationally.”, said Martin Walker, Roadmap Editorial Board Chair.

The SIENA Roadmap will be launched at Cloudscape IV along with position papers from speakers and selected panellists.

Event Details

  • 23-24 February 2012, European Commission, Avenue de Beaulieu, Building, 25, Brussels, Belgium

  • SIENA Initiative

     

Announcing the Cloudscape IV conference

Cloudscape IV – Advances in Interoperability & Cloud Computing Standards

Cloud computing is moving at an incredibly fast pace, calling for more flexible and swifter responses not only to address adoption barriers but also take up of new opportunities. In the scientific arena, data intensive problems are gaining significant success with cloud computing as they have the closely coupled structure well supported in clouds and are typically “new applications” that are attractive to build from scratch with programming models suited for clouds.

While cloud may not be a magic wand for all situations requiring some form of distributed computing, we are getting closer to understanding where it works best in scientific settings. However, a great deal of work remains to be done in achieving interoperability and portability of data to avoid vendor lock-in and build choice so scientists, governments and citizens can decide which technologies work best for them. Data protection is a hot topic that needs addressing at policy level as one of the three pillars underpinning the European Union’s cloud computing strategy to create a legal framework regulating users’ rights.

Cloudscape IV, 23-24 February at the European Commission in Brussels, aims to drive forward the priority actions captured in the SIENA Roadmap by placing interoperability, data portability, legal impediments and security high on the agenda. Industry views come from several large enterprises at the forefront of cloud computing to help foster standards implementation for interoperability and data portability in the light of on-going and future work. A Call to Action is supported by major standards bodies in response to current and emerging requirements. “Through the flagship Cloudscape workshops, SIENA offers a forum to track emerging standards and technologies, evaluate impediments and raise greater awareness of this dynamic and complex landscape, said Silvana Muscella, Technical Coordinator of the SIENA initiative, which is funded by the Commission’s GÉANT and e-Infrastructures Unit.

On the international front, Cloudscape IV will seek to blaze a trail for stronger international cooperation on global challenges. The workshop host, the SIENA initiative, will be seeking to build on synergies with the US National Institute of Standards (NIST) the US National Science Foundation, and the Global Inter-Cloud Technology Forum (GICTF), a Japanese-led initiative. Insights into cloud computing in Brazil will also shed light on global developments paving the way for new cooperation partnerships with Europe. European perspectives shine the spotlight on cloud computing for the Digital Agenda, with a keynote from Mario Campolargo, Director DG INFSO Emerging Technologies and Infrastructures, European Commission. Other perspectives will focus on re-usable assets of distributed computing infrastructures, insights into use cases for e-research and government, new cloud partnerships, research and development and initiatives like EuroCIOs and EuroCloud.

The multi-stakeholder dialogue will thus seek to define steps for the public and private sector dialogue in an effort to overcome barriers, stimulate uptake and innovation so as to reap the full potential of cloud computing in Europe. “We hope that our roadmap will heighten awareness and reinforce the importance and value of sustainable e-infrastructure providing vital services to a broader research user base In Europe and internationally.”, said Martin Walker, Roadmap Editorial Board Chair.

The SIENA Roadmap will be launched at Cloudscape IV along with position papers from speakers and selected panellists.

Event Details

  • 23-24 February 2012, European Commission, Avenue de Beaulieu, Building, 25, Brussels, Belgium

  • SIENA Initiative

     

EGI Mascot Competition winners

After a 5-month long search in our competition to find a mascot for the European Grid Infrastructure, we are pleased to announce the final results.

The Grand Winner prize, as judged by a panel at EGI.eu, is awarded to ‘EGI@nt’ the ant. The People’s Choice prize, determined by an online poll, is awarded to Pegi the peafowl.

Congratulations to the winners! Prizes will be awarded at the EGI Community Forum 2012 held in Munich from 26 to 30 March.

EGI ant

EGI@nt: the grand winner

Pegi the peafowl

Pegi: the people's favourite

 

EGI Mascot Competition winners

After a 5-month long search in our competition to find a mascot for the European Grid Infrastructure, we are pleased to announce the final results.

The Grand Winner prize, as judged by a panel at EGI.eu, is awarded to ‘EGI@nt’ the ant. The People’s Choice prize, determined by an online poll, is awarded to Pegi the peafowl.

Congratulations to the winners! Prizes will be awarded at the EGI Community Forum 2012 held in Munich from 26 to 30 March.

EGI ant

EGI@nt: the grand winner

Pegi the peafowl

Pegi: the people's favourite

 

Registration for ISGC 2012 opens

Online registration in now open for the International Symposium on Grids and Clouds (ISGC) 2012, which will be held at Academia Sinica in Taipei (26 February-2 March 2012), alongside co-located events and workshops. The conference is hosted by the Academia Sinica Grid Computing Centre (ASGC), Taipei, Taiwan.

The theme of the conference is ‘Convergence, Collaboration, Innovation’. The last decade has seen the wide-scale emergence of e-Infrastructure as a critical asset for the modern e-Scientist. The emergence of large-scale research infrastructures and instruments that has produced a torrent of electronic data is forcing a generational change in the scientific process and the mechanisms used to analyse the resulting data deluge.

ISGC 2012 will be the 10th meeting that over the last decade has tracked the convergence, collaboration and innovation of individual researchers across the Asia Pacific region to a coherent community and as a result has helped drive the growth of regional e-Science activities and its collaborations around the world. In the opening session of this year’s symposium, Dr Robert Jones will recapitulate the journey of ISGC in the past decade. In addition, there will be current status reports on Grids and Clouds developments in Europe, the Americas, and Asia given by Dr Steven Newhouse, Dr Victoria White, and Dr Simon Lin, respectively.

This year we invited 4 keynote speakers: Prof John R. Delaney, from University of Washington, talks about “Understanding the planetary life support system: next generation science in the ocean basins”, Prof Alexandre Bonvin, from WeNMR, gives a talk on “WeNMR: bringing Grid (and Cloud) computing to a worldwide structural biology community”, Prof Thomas Sterling, from Indiana University, talks about “Towards an Execution Model for HPC Clouds”, Prof Alexander S. Szalay, from Johns Hopkins University, giving a speech on “Extreme Data-Intensive Scientific Computing”, and Prof Satoshi Matsuoka from the Global Scientific Information and Computing Center & Department of Mathematical and Computing Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology.

More information is available at the conference website